News & Updates

Apr 28, 2016 by CLDNR

On April 22, Judge Allen Sumner of the Sacramento Superior Court appointed our partner, Amanda Riddle, to serve as co-liaison counsel for the victims of the Butte Fire. The Butte Fire was started by PG&E on September 9, 2015. The fire burned for three weeks before it was contained by CalFire. During that time, the fire devastated over 70,000 acres in Amador and Calaveras Counties, killed two people and caused bodily injury to numerous others, and destroyed a total of 921 structures including: 549 homes, 368 outbuildings, and 4 commercial properties. Over 1,600 individuals have filed suit against PG&E, and its subcontractors, ACRT and Trees, Inc. Ms. Riddle was nominated for the liaison counsel position by counsel for all Plaintiffs as a result of her exemplary work as co-liaison counsel for Plaintiffs in the PG&E “San Bruno Fire” Cases.

The attorneys are working with the Court to develop a case management plan and a schedule that will expeditiously move the cases through the litigation process, with the hopes of a swift resolution for the victims, especially those of advanced age and suffering from medical conditions that require priority treatment.  The Court scheduled an informal conference with Plaintiffs’ liaison counsel and Defense counsel on May 11, to discuss the logistics of coordinating the cases in the Sacramento Superior Court and a further Case Management Conference on May 24, where counsel will report on the progress of the case.  If you have any questions about this case, please contact our attorneys Dario de Ghetaldi, Amanda Riddle, or Clare Capaccioli Velasquez.

Feb 17, 2016 by CLDNR

We are pleased to share Clare Capaccioli Velasquez’s article entitled “My First Trial: Long Discovery Avoids Surprises in the Courtroom,” where she details her successful use of discovery tactics in a recent trial. After the article went to press, the court entered judgment in favor of our client. Congratulations, Clare, on your publication, completing your first trial, and the victory.

Jan 07, 2016 by CLDNR

We are lucky to have seasoned attorney, Levon “Lee” Sagatelyan, associate with our firm as Of Counsel.  Lee joins us after 37 years of leading a respected law firm and practice grounded in the traditions of the San Mateo County Bar Association and community.  He will continue his practice in the areas Trust and Estate Litigation, Elder Law, Estate Planning and Probate, and General Civil Litigation, including Personal Injury, Real Property and Business Litigation.

Dec 15, 2015 by CLDNR

Attorneys Amanda L. Riddle and Jennifer E. McGuire work with our employer clients to develop and update employment policies and practices focused on each business’ particular needs.  We make every effort to keep our clients up to date on developments in employment law, and are pleased to share with everyone “Employer Update – Special Edition,” which highlights important changes to the Affordable Care Act aka “ObamaCare” for 2016.  Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions about the Affordable Care Act or if we can be of help to your business.

Dec 08, 2015 by CLDNR

Avoiding costly employment litigation begins with the establishment of effective employee policies and procedures.  Attorneys Amanda L. Riddle and Jennifer E. McGuire work with our employer clients to develop and update employment policies and practices focused on each business’ particular needs.  We make every effort to keep our clients up to date on developments in employment law, and are excited to share with everyone the December 2015 edition of “Employer Update,” our newsletter highlighting important updates in the law for 2016.  Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions about these updates or if we can be of help to your business.

Oct 22, 2015 by CLDNR

We are here to help the victims of the Butte Fire.  Please join us for an informational session on Monday, October 26, at 6:00 p.m., at the Calaveras Senior Center.

Hear from:

Milstone Geotechnical and

Attorneys Mike Danko and Amanda Riddle

 Hear about:

Soil Erosion Concerns

Tree and Debris Removal

PG&E’s putting profits over safety

Claims for Property Damage including Trees

Restoring the Community

 

Link

PG&E saves money by collecting money from rate payers to perform maintenance and then deferring the work. The extra money on the books results in bigger bonuses for PG&E’s management. It looks like the same thing happened here, resulting in a tree that PG&E should have trimmed impacting a 12,000-volt power line and sparking the 70,000-acre Butte Fire in the Sierra foothills. Our attorneys successfully represented 45 families who were injured and lost their homes as a result of the PG&E San Bruno Explosion in 2010. We are here to help the victims of the Butte Fires. Contact Dario de Ghetaldi or Amanda Riddle if you have been impacted: 650-871-5666, or deg@coreylaw.com or alr@coreylaw.com.

Jul 17, 2015 by CLDNR

THE HEALTHY WORKPLACES, HEALTHY FAMILIES ACT OF 2014

            California is now the second state in the nation to implement paid sick leave state-wide, passing “The Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014”.  (AB 1522; California Labor Code § 245 et seq.)  Here is what you need to know about this law (this memorandum has been updated to include the amendments to the law (AB 304) enacted on July 13, 2015):

The Basics

  • Beginning July 1, 2015, every employee, whether exempt or non-exempt, full-time or part-time, who works in California for at least 30 days within a year from the commencement of employment, will be entitled to accrue paid sick leave at the employee’s regular rate of pay.  Note that this could mean that employers who have employees who live outside of California, but who travel into California to perform work for more than 30 days within a year, could be eligible for sick leave under this Act.  The July 13, 2015, amendment clarifies that the employee must work for the same employer for at least 30 days within the previous 12 months to be eligible to accrue paid sick leave with that employer.
  • There is no small employer exemption.
  • There is no minimum number of employees requirement.
  • The following employees are exempt from this law:  (1) employees covered by a valid collective bargaining agreement that expressly provides for the wages, hours, and working conditions and that also expressly provides for paid sick days and other requirements; (2) persons employed in the construction industry covered by a valid collective bargaining agreement that satisfies certain requirements; (3) a provider of in-home support services under specified parts of the Welfare and Institutions Code; and (4) persons employed by an airline as a flight deck or cabin crew member subject to certain provisions of the federal Railway Labor Act.  The July 13, 2015 amendment also adds a retired annuitant of a public entity and a worker covered by the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act to this list.

Providing Employees with Sick Leave Time

  • Employers can provide employees with paid sick leave by the accrual method or the lump sum method.
  • Accrual Method:
  • Sick leave accrues at a rate of not less than one hour per every 30 hours worked commencing on the first day of employment or the effective date of the new law (July 1, 2015), whichever is later.  Exempt employees are deemed to work 40 hours per week, unless the employee normally works a workweek of less than 40 hours.  The July 13, 2015, amendment permits employers to use a different accrual method so long as the accrual is on a regular basis and employees have at least 24 hours of accrued sick time or other paid time off no later than the 120th day of employment of each calendar year or other 12 month basis.
  • In addition, the July 13, 2015, amendment, includes a grandfather clause for employers that provided paid sick leave or paid time off/vacation before January 1, 2015, that used a different accrual method than permitted in the bullet point above.  An employer’s accrual method will be grandfathered in provided that (a) the accrual is on a regular basis so that an employee (including one hired after January 1, 2015) has no less than one day or eight hours of accrued sick leave or paid time off within three months of employment each calendar year or 12 month period, and (b) the employee was eligible to earn at least 24 hours of sick leave or paid time off within nine months of employment.  If an employer modifies the accrual method used in the policy that it had in place prior to January 1, 2015, it will need to comply with the new law, including the amendments.
  • Employer can choose to cap accrual at 48 hours (6 days) of sick leave per year.
  • An employer may limit an employee’s use of accrued paid sick days to three days or 24 hours per year of employment.
  • Accrued but unused sick days carry over to the following year, however, that carry-over is subject to the accrual cap (if the employer chooses to implement one.)
  • Lump Sum Method:
  • Employers can choose to provide paid leave of no less than 24 hours or three days, with no accrual or carry over required, if the full amount of leave is received by the employee in a lump sum at the beginning of the year.  A “year” is the each year beginning with anniversary of employment, a calendar year or any other 12 month period.
  • Employers with paid sick leave or PTO policies do not need to change anything if their current policy:
  • Makes available an amount of leave that may be used for the same purposes as the new law (detailed below); and
  • Satisfies the accrual, carry over, and use requirements of the Act and California vacation and PTO pay requirements; or
  • Provides for no less than 24 hours (3 days) of paid sick leave, or equivalent paid leave or paid time off per year.
  • However, all employers must still comply with the record keeping and notice requirements (detailed below).

Usage and Pay

  • An employee may use accrued paid sick leave beginning on the 90th day of employment.
  • Sick leave may be used for the diagnosis, care, or treatment of an existing health condition, or preventive care (including annual physical or flu shots) for an employee or an employee’s family member.  Family members include the employee’s parent, child, spouse, registered domestic partner, grandparent, grandchild, and sibling.
  • Sick leave may also be used for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.
  • For partial days i.e. using sick leave for a doctor’s appointment, an employer can require the employee to take at least two hours of leave, but otherwise the determination of how much time is needed is left to the employee.
  • Employers must permit the employee to use the paid sick leave upon an oral or written request.
  • If the need is foreseeable the employee must give reasonable advance notice, but where the need is unforeseeable the employee need only give notice as soon as practicable.
  • The law forbids requiring an employee to find a replacement as a condition for using leave.
  • Employees must be paid at their regular hourly rate.  If the employee’s pay fluctuates – for example, pay on a commission or piece rate – the total compensation for the previous 90 days is divided by the number of hours worked to determine the rate of pay.  The July 13, 2015, amendment provides an alternative to this method of determining the rate of pay for employees with fluctuating pay rates:  First, for non-exempt employees, employers may use the same regular rate of pay used for overtime pay during the work week that the employee takes sick leave.  Second, for exempt employees, employers can use the same rate used for other forms of paid leave.
  • An employer must provide payment for sick leave taken by an employee no later than the payday for the next regular payroll period after the sick leave was taken.

Notice and Record Keeping Requirements

  • Starting July 1, 2015, employers must show, on employee’s pay stub or a separate document issued the same day as the paycheck, how many days of sick leave the employee has available.  For employers in the broadcasting and motion picture industry, the July 13, 2015, amendment delays this requirement until January 21, 2016.  The July 13, 2015 amendment allows employers who maintain unlimited sick leave policies to indicate “unlimited” on the relevant document.  Employers are not required to inquire into or record the purpose for which the leave was taken.
  • The employer is obligated to post notice of the Act (enclosed and can be found on the DLSE website.)  This requirement went into effect on January 1, 2015.
  • All non-exempt employees must be provided an individualized Notice to Employee that includes paid sick leave information (enclosed and can be found on the DLSE website.)

Termination of Employment

  • The employee is not entitled to compensation for unused sick leave days.
  • Compare to accrued but unused vacation days or PTO.  Those are earned wages and compensation is required if they remain unused at end of employment.
  • However, if an employee leaves the employment, but returns within 12 months, the accrued, but unused, sick leave must be restored.  In addition, the 90 day probationary period starts where the employee left off.  This is something to keep in mind for seasonal employees.

Compliance Checklist

  • Display the poster.
  • Provide written notice to employees of sick leave rights at the time of their hire.
  • Make sure policies comply with AB 1522 and AB 304.
  • Allow eligible employees to use accrued paid sick leave upon reasonable request.
  • Provide pay stubs or comparable document on the same day as pay stub that details available sick leave hours.
  • Keep records for three years that show many sick leave hours employees have earned and used.
  • Train supervisors on the requirements of this new law and on the Cautions! below.

Caution!

  • Employers may not deny an employee the right to use accrued sick days, discharge, threaten to discharge, demote, suspend, or in any manner discriminate against an employee for using or attempting to use accrued sick days.
  • The Act provides for a variety of monetary and non-monetary remedies for violations of its various provisions.
  • The Act does not preempt local ordinances.  This means employers in San Francisco, Oakland, Emeryville and San Diego – or employers whose employees perform the minimum required number of hours of work in those cities (San Francisco:  56 hours of work within a calendar year; Oakland:  2 hours per workweek) – which each have their own sick leave ordinances, will be required to provide sick leave that complies with both state and local laws.

Questions?  Contact Amanda L. Riddle at alr@coreylaw.com or 650-871-5666.

 

Jul 09, 2015 by CLDNR

We congratulate George Corey, Stevan Luzaich, Dario de Ghetaldi, Jerry Nastari, and Amanda Riddle for being selected to the 2015 Northern California Super Lawyers List.  We are also pleased to announce that Jennifer McGuire was named to the 2015 Northern California Rising Star List.

Super Lawyers is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high-degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The selection process is multi-phased and includes independent research, peer nominations and peer evaluations.  Super Lawyers launched Rising Stars to recognize the top up-and-coming attorneys in the state — those who are 40 years old or younger, or who have been practicing for 10 years or less.

Link

In its June 26, 2015, 5-4 landmark decision, the United States Supreme Court declared that the fundamental right to marry extends to same-sex couples, making same-sex marriage legal nationwide.  The Court held that refusing to grant marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples violates the United States Constitution, and that states must recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex when their marriage was lawfully licensed and performed out-of-State.  Writing for the majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy stated:

“No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were. As some of the petitioners in these cases demonstrate, marriage embodies a love that may endure even past death. It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it, respect it so deeply that they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization’s oldest institutions. They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right.”

To read the Court’s entire opinion, along with the dissenting Justices’ comments, click here.

May 18, 2015 by CLDNR

Attorneys Amanda Riddle and Jennifer McGuire will present the following MCLE to the Women Lawyers’ Section of the San Mateo County Bar Association:

Understanding Pregnancy Leave and Return to Work Rights

Tuesday, June 2, 2015, Noon-1:30 p.m.
Hobee’s Restaurant
1101 Shoreway Road
Belmont, CA 94002
1.0 Hours of Elimination of Bias MCLE Credit

The Women Lawyer’s Section presents an MCLE on pregnancy leave and related return to work rights. Understanding the laws related to pregnancy and employment can be challenging. On the one hand, pregnant employees need to understand their rights with respect to job protection and wage replacement. On the other hand, employers must comply with pregnancy disability leave laws, disability accommodation issues, and lactation requirements that impact their employees. Amanda L. Riddle and Jennifer E. McGuire will discuss recent developments in these areas and provide guidance to both pregnant women and employers on how to navigate this complex set of legal issues.

Please RSVP by May 29, 2015 to Diana Prisk at dlp@coreylaw.com or by calling her at 650-871-5666. Price per member is $35 and non-member is $45. Please send your check made payable to SMCBA to Diana Prisk, Corey, Luzaich, de Ghetaldi, Nastari & Riddle LLP, 700 El Camino Real, Millbrae, CA 94030.

Apr 10, 2015 by CLDNR

After more than four and a half years, the California Public Utility Commission imposed one of the largest fines ever levied on a utility company for the San Bruno explosion. While this won’t erase the memories of the horrific event or bring back loved ones, this is a step in the right direction.

Read the full story here.

Mar 31, 2015 by CLDNR

THE HEALTHY WORKPLACES, HEALTHY FAMILIES ACT OF 2014

California is now the second state in the nation to implement paid sick leave state-wide, passing “The Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014”.  (AB 1522; California Labor Code § 245 et seq.)  Here is what you need to know about this law:

The Basics

  • Beginning July 1, 2015, every employee, whether exempt or non-exempt, full-time or part-time, who works in California for at least 30 days within a year from the commencement of employment, will be entitled to accrue paid sick leave at the employee’s regular rate of pay.  Note that this could mean that employers who have employees who live outside of California, but who travel into California to perform work for more than 30 days within a year, could be eligible for sick leave under this Act.
  • There is no small employer exemption.
  • There is no minimum number of employees requirement.
  • The following employees are exempt from this law:  (1) employees covered by a valid collective bargaining agreement that expressly provides for the wages, hours, and working conditions and that also expressly provides for paid sick days and other requirements; (2) persons employed in the construction industry covered by a valid collective bargaining agreement that satisfies certain requirements; (3) a provider of in-home support services under specified parts of the Welfare and Institutions Code; and (4) persons employed by an airline as a flight deck or cabin crew member subject to certain provisions of the federal Railway Labor Act.

Providing Employees with Sick Leave Time

  • Employers can provide employees with paid sick leave by the accrual method or the lump sum method.
  • Accrual Method:
  • Sick leave accrues at a rate of not less than one hour per every 30 hours worked commencing on the first day of employment or the effective date of the new law (July 1, 2015), whichever is later.  Exempt employees are deemed to work 40 hours per week, unless the employee normally works a workweek of less than 40 hours.
  • Employer can choose to cap accrual at 48 hours (6 days) of sick leave per year.
  • An employer may limit an employee’s use of accrued paid sick days to three days or 24 hours per year of employment.
  •       Accrued but unused sick days carry over to the following year, however, that carry-over is subject to the accrual cap (if the employer chooses to implement one.)
  • Lump Sum Method:
  •       Employers can choose to provide paid leave of no less than 24 hours or three days, with no accrual or carry over required, if the full amount of leave is received by the employee in a lump sum at the beginning of the year.
  • The beginning of the year is either July 1, 2015, or the date of hire, whichever is later.
  • Employers with paid sick leave or PTO policies do not need to change anything if their current policy:  (1)  Makes available an amount of leave that may be used for the same purposes as the new law (detailed below); and (2) Satisfies the accrual, carry over, and use requirements of the Act; or Provides for no less than 24 hours (3 days) of paid sick leave, or equivalent paid leave or paid time off per year.  However, all employers must still comply with the record keeping and notice requirements (detailed below).
  • An employer may lend paid sick days to an employee in advance of accrual, at the employer’s discretion and with proper documentation.

Usage and Pay

  • An employee may use accrued paid sick leave beginning on the 90th day of employment.
  • Sick leave may be used for the diagnosis, care, or treatment of an existing health condition, or preventive care (including annual physical or flu shots) for an employee or an employee’s family member.  Family members include the employee’s parent, child, spouse, registered domestic partner, grandparent, grandchild, and sibling.
  • Sick leave may also be used for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.
  • For partial days i.e. using sick leave for a doctor’s appointment, an employer can require the employee to take at least two hours of leave, but otherwise the determination of how much time is needed is left to the employee.
  • Employers must permit the employee to use the paid sick leave upon an oral or written request.
  • If the need is foreseeable the employee must give reasonable advance notice, but where the need is unforeseeable the employee need only give notice as soon as practicable.
  • The law forbids requiring an employee to find a replacement as a condition for using leave.
  • Employees must be paid at their regular hourly rate.  If the employee’s pay fluctuates – for example, pay on a commission or piece rate – the total compensation for the previous 90 days is divided by the number of hours worked to determine the rate of pay.
  • An employer must provide payment for sick leave taken by an employee no later than the payday for the next regular payroll period after the sick leave was taken.

Notice and Record Keeping Requirements

  • Starting July 1, 2015, employers must show, on employee’s pay stub or a separate document issued the same day as the paycheck, how many days of sick leave the employee has available.
  • The employer is obligated to post notice of the Act.  This requirement went into effect on January 1, 2015.
  • All non-exempt employees must be provided an individualized Notice to Employee that includes paid sick leave information.

Termination of Employment

  • The employee is not entitled to compensation for unused sick leave days.
  • Compare to accrued but unused vacation days or PTO.  Those are earned wages and compensation is required if they remain unused at end of employment.
  • However, if an employee leaves the employment, but returns within 12 months, the accrued sick leave must be restored.  In addition, the 90 day probationary period starts where the employee left off.  This is something to keep in mind for seasonal employees.

Caution!

  • Employers may not deny an employee the right to use accrued sick days, discharge, threaten to discharge, demote, suspend, or in any manner discriminate against an employee for using or attempting to use accrued sick days.
  • The Act provides for a variety of monetary and non-monetary remedies for violations of its various provisions.
  • The Act does not preempt local ordinances that provide for greater accrual or use of sick leave by employees.  This means employers in San Francisco and San Diego, which each have their own sick leave ordinances, will be required to provide sick leave that complies with both state and local laws.

Please feel free to contact Amanda L. Riddle if you have any questions.

Click here for this article in Chinese.  Healthy Workplaces Healthy Families Act 2014- Chinese

 

 

 

Jul 09, 2014 by CLDNR

We congratulate George Corey, Stevan Luzaich, Dario de Ghetaldi, Jerry Nastari, and Amanda Riddle for being selected to the 2014 Northern California Super Lawyers List.  We are also pleased to announce that Jennifer McGuire was named to the 2014 Northern California Rising Star List.

Super Lawyers is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high-degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The selection process is multi-phased and includes independent research, peer nominations and peer evaluations.  Super Lawyers launched Rising Stars to recognize the top up-and-coming attorneys in the state — those who are 40 years old or younger, or who have been practicing for 10 years or less.

Jan 10, 2014 by CLDNR

We are pleased to announce that our partner, Amanda L. Riddle, received the James M. Dennis Memorial Award.  The award is presented each year by the San Mateo County Bar Association in recognition of the attorney whose courage and determination, even in the face of adversity, contributes significantly to justice in the community and raises the ethical standards of the San Mateo County Bar Association.

Though the past recipients of this award average some 33 years’ experience in the practice of law, Ms. Riddle received this award having just over 12 years of experience. However, during that time, she has accomplished a great deal.  Ms. Riddle serves as co-liaison counsel for all plaintiffs in the PG&E San Bruno Fire Cases.  By the third anniversary of the massive explosion and fire, Ms. Riddle had secured settlements for 142 plaintiffs represented by her firm.  Amanda’s commitment to her community includes co-founding San Mateo County Bar Association Legal Clinic Committee, which provides on-site legal services to residents of homeless shelters on the Peninsula, organizing Lawyers in the Gutter, a fundraiser for Samaritan House, and establishing the San Mateo County Bar Association Barristers’ annual Holiday Dinner, providing low-income families with a holiday meal.

Dec 12, 2013 by CLDNR

Over the past 50 years, through hard work, intellect, and a lot of charm, George R. Corey has built a reputation and a law firm renowned in San Mateo County and beyond. He is a remarkable lawyer, partner, mentor, and friend.

 

George Corey at his “Very Important Meeting” Bench, where he goes every morning for coffee. The bench was put in on his 65th birthday.

George Corey at his “Very Important Meeting” Bench, where he goes every morning for coffee. The bench was put in on his 65th birthday.

 

The same courage and dedication that paved the way for a successful and illustrious legal career also made George a legend in his hometown of Ambridge, Pennsylvania. When he was inducted into the Ambridge Hall of Fame in the 1990’s, local shopkeepers still remembered his greatest high school football plays. He went on to play football for the University of Michigan and after serving his country as a Lieutenant in the Air Force, he entered Hastings College of the Law.

With a wife and four children at home, George worked his way through Hastings as a janitor, alongside former Mayor Willie Brown. During his janitorial duties, George unwittingly pushed his broom into Joe Cotchett’s shoes, igniting a scuffle and friendship that has lasted to this day.

The day after George passed the bar exam in 1964, he opened his first office in Millbrae with Jack Bible. Shortly thereafter he read a call for volunteers to represent defendants charged in the sit-in demonstrations in San Francisco car dealerships. Demonstrators were protesting discriminatory hiring practices and demanding integration of the sales force. And so, fresh out of law school, without a dime to spare, a career of advocating for the rights of the average citizen began.

Part of a legal team that defended 500 protestors in the car dealership sit-ins, George was in the trenches with some of San Francisco’s finest trial lawyers. There he learned the true meaning of advocacy. George has the uncanny ability to sway his opponents by crafting unique and well-reasoned arguments that make adversaries forget why they disagreed with him in the first place. Though George fights tirelessly for his clients, he is always courteous and kind. He earns the respect of his clients and opposing counsel. Quite often, former adversaries call him for advice. George does not lose clients – people from five decades ago return to his office.

As renowned as his legal career is George’s commitment to his community. As the senior partner in his firm, he leads by example that lawyers owe a duty not only to the community but also to the legal profession. George’s longstanding commitment to advocating for the rights of the average citizen extends to the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County, where he continues to act as Chair Emeritus. A fixture in San Mateo County, George served as Mayor of San Bruno from 1972 to 1973, served on the San Bruno City Council and founded the Peninsula Bank of Commerce.  He has acted as a director of a myriad of community service and non-profit organizations, most recently as a director of Shelter Network.

Those who have had the privilege of knowing George know that he is far more comfortable in his Michigan sweatshirt than a shirt and tie. George’s ability to relate to everyone and see people for who they are means that he is equally comfortable chatting with his buddies over cigars and coffee at his “very important meeting” at the bench that sits outside Safeway across from his office as he is taking Fortune 500 companies to task. George’s bench was officially dedicated to him in 1998 along with a plaque which bears his name, a gift from his partners. The same crowd and a few others join George for Monday Night Football at the office where they laugh, swap stories, and trade off preparing amazing, home-cooked meals.

Working with and knowing George Corey is truly a privilege. He teaches young lawyers not only that they must give back to the community and the profession, but also about the business of the law, prioritizing the importance of reputation and fostering lifelong relationships. When people come, lawyers and staff included, they stay. George and his partner Steve Luzaich have worked together for 38 years. His former bookkeeper retired at age 87 and his longest standing current employee has been with him for over 36 years. The lawyers in his office know that his door is always open, drafts are marked up with his characteristic black sharpie pen, and that George’s perspective and mentoring are invaluable. He fosters a congenial work environment, where hard work is expected but so are smiles and laughter. A meal shared with George is a joyful, educational pleasure. Those of us in his office are better lawyers and people for having worked with George.

Congratulations on fifty years in the practice of law, George Corey. You bring honor to our profession and it is privilege to know and work with you.

Written by  Jennifer E. McGuire, Janelle F. Allen, Clare Capaccioli Velasquez

Nov 07, 2013 by CLDNR

On September 9, 2010, tragedy struck San Bruno when a 30-inch natural gas transmission line owned and operated by Pacific Gas & Electric Company exploded beneath the residential Crestmoor neighborhood.  The explosion and resulting fire left eight people dead, including two children, and injured dozens more, destroyed 40 homes, and left the residents of San Bruno with physical and emotional scars.  Over the last three years, our law firm has had the honor of representing 45 families, for a total of 142 people, who fell victim to the explosion.  Last week, all our remaining cases resolved, bringing much needed and deserved financial and emotional relief to our clients. We could not be more proud of the work that we have done for these clients.

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